Project 3 Part 1

Paul Mueller and Randi Frehner

4/7/10

General Information

Subject: Clouds

Length of Lesson: 4 separate parts of 30 minutes each. Total of 3 hours.

Grade Level: 4th grade

Short Description/Summary: I’ll discuss cloud types with my students and have them look at visuals, go to websites, and take them outside to identify different clouds that are in the sky.

Student Learning

Connection to standards:

Utah K-12 Core Curriculum

Objective 1

Observe, measure, and record the basic elements of weather.

a. Identify basic cloud types (i.e., cumulus, cirrus, stratus clouds).

NETS-T

1. Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity

    Teachers use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments. Teachers:

  1. promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students’ conceptual understanding and thinking, planning, and creative processes.

 

Objectives:

Students will be able to identify the cumulus, cirrus, and stratus clouds through their appearance, height, and weather associated with the cloud. Students will become familiar with a concept map to complete this activity and fill in all the information correctly.

Assessment:

We will discuss the cloud types both before, after, and during the activity. This will give me a general sense of what the students know beforehand, what they’ve learned, and their processes of learning.

The assignment will give me more concrete information of what the students have learned and what they have mistaken. I’ll be flexible with my grading, as some students may use different adjectives to describe the clouds, or be a little less specific, but get the general idea (although I’ll encourage specifics: ex. Above 20,000 feet).

 

Lesson Preparation

Technology Resources Required:

Making a concept map, using visual on the computer, and having the students look at websites on the computer.

Background for teachers:

Websites:

http://eo.ucar.edu/webweather/cloud3.html

http://www.historyforkids.org/scienceforkids/physics/weather/clouds.htm

 This is the Concept Map assignment:

https://rkfrehner.wordpress.com/projects/project-3-concept-map/

Rubric:

http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0Al-6rP7Qk-p1dHcxakxpNFJMSkJjUk1EbzNVak85TEE&hl=en

Setup:

Go to the websites and make sure you know the cloud types. Be able to guide the students on the websites, discuss the cloud types before hand, during, and after, and try to have this lesson on a day with clouds in the sky (preferably a few different kinds, but it’s fine if there’s only one).

Time: Lesson outline 
  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction:

  • Start a discussion about what you like about clouds, what it would be like without them, ect.
  • Discuss before hand what the students already know about clouds. What sorts of clouds are most common, which ones cause storms, ect.
  • Talk about previous weather lessons

Content/Activity:

  • Prior knowledge activity, visuals and description, computer activity, identifying clouds outside, concept map and conclusion.
  • Websites, visuals, and concept map
  • Ask deep learning questions to conclude

Closure:

  • Discussion about clouds, ask deep learning questions, and get students to sum up their thoughts and what they’ve learned about clouds.

Evaluation:

  • Through discussions you’ll know how the students are learning and how, and through the concept map you’ll see what the learned and what they had a hard time with.

Accommodations

  • For a student who is bilingual, ask what clouds are called in their language and get them comparing their language to English.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: